Beauty and Personal Care

Using certified stones as part of an investment portfolio

Certified stones are also often used as part of an investment portfolio and disappear into a safe to be re-traded at a later date. If the stone is removed from the seal to be used in jewellery, the stone can be identified at a later stage by its number and worktop and then re-sealed.

Some examples of laboratories are: Hoge Raad voor de Diamant (HRD), Dutch Gemstone Laboratory, International Gemological Institute (IGI), Gemological Institute of America (GIA). In 2012, the High Council for Diamonds discovered fraud in certificates. Certificates were forged so that diamonds could be sold at higher prices.

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Promise of Lesotho: 603 carats. One of the largest unprocessed diamonds ever found.
Centenary diamond: after cutting 273,88 carats, found in 1986.
Cullinan I or Star of Africa: 530,20 carats. Obtained from the Cullinan, with 3106 carats it is the largest rough diamond ever found. Together with 104 other stones cut by the Diamond Cutter Asscher in Amsterdam in 1908. Decorates the sceptre of the kings of England. It is kept in the Tower of London. This was until 1997 the largest cut diamond.
Cullinan IV: 63,60 carat. One of the 105 stones cut from the Cullinan. Located in the crown of Queen Mary. Can also be taken from the crown and worn as a brooch. It is kept in the Tower in London.

Unsaid Library makes it possible to express your emotions using beautiful pieces of jewelry. Unsaid Library combines the most intens emotions with the most beautiful bracelets, rings, necklaces and pendants. You can find more of this on the website of Unsaid Library.

Darya-ye Noor (sea of light): estimated 182 carats, from India, owned by Iranian government.
Dresden green diamond: 41.00 carat, probably from India, earliest history not known. In 1742 by Friedrich August II, Elector of Saxony, bought for 400 000 talers. It is kept in the Grünes Gewölbe in Dresden.
Florentiner or Toscaner: 137.27 carats, Early history surrounded by legends. In 1657 in the possession of the Medici in Florence, In the 18th century in the crown of the Habsburgs, then used as a brooch.
Hopediamond: 45.52 carats, appeared in 1830 on the market and was bought by banker H.Ph. Hope. Probably recut from a stolen stone. Also part of the French crown jewels. Since 1958 at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington.
Koh-i-Noor: 108,93 carats. Originally in round form with 186 carats owned by Indian monarchs. Acquired in 1739 by the Shah of Persia. Later came into the possession of the British East India Company, which donated it to Queen Victoria in 1850. He was first given a place in the crown of Queen Mary, wife of George V, and later in the crown of Queen Mother Elizabeth. It is kept in the Tower of London.
Nassak: 43.38 carats. Originally more than 90 carats, was located in India in a Shiva temple near Nassak. Acquired by the British in 1818 as a war booty. In 1927 cut in New York. Now in private possession in the United States.
Sancy: 55 carats. Apparently worn by Charles the Bold (around 1470). In 1570 acquired by the French envoy in Turkey, Signeur de Sancy. Since 1906 in the possession of the Astor family in London.
Shah: 88.70 carats. Comes from Iran, has wear boxes, partly polished. Carries three inscriptions with names of rulers. In 1829 donated to czar Nicholas I of Russia. Nowadays in the Kremlin in Moscow.
Tiffany: 128,51 carats. Found in 1878 in the Kimberley mine in South Africa, with a rough weight of 287.42 carats. Acquired by the jewelry company Tiffany in New York. Cut in Paris with 90 facets.

Industrial diamond
Diamonds are formed under high pressure at a depth between 140 and 190 kilometres in the earth’s mantle by compression of carbon. They are brought to the earth’s surface by rapid transport by means of explosive volcanoes. The volcanic rock has a characteristic blue colour and is called kimberlite after the place Kimberley in South Africa. In the nineties of the 20th century there was a diamond rush in northern Canada after the discovery of a kimberite pipe with economically recoverable diamonds in Lac de Gras in 1991.

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In addition to deposits in kimber loopt pipes and their immediate surroundings, diamonds also occur in alluvial deposits. In India, the delta of the river Krishna was traditionally the site of alluvial diamonds. Alluvial diamonds are also found in the Sperrgebiet south of Lüderitz on the coast of Namibia and in the adjacent coastal area of South Africa. In these areas, diamonds can be found in a sand layer up to a few metres below the surface. These areas are closed to anyone who has no business there. Part of the diamond is also washed into the Atlantic Ocean and is mined there by diamond fishermen.

High-pressure subduction zones may function as an alternative parent rock for diamonds. In the Beni Bousera massif in northern Morocco, micro diamond associations have been found that can be used in this direction.

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